Article Abstract

Radiofrequency ablation and breast cancer: a review

Authors: Tiffany Nguyen, Eleanor Hattery, Vijay P. Khatri

Abstract

Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) use in breast cancer is a developing area of research. There have been a number of published studies over the last decade, which explores the feasibility of minimally invasive techniques in breast cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss the most recent data on radiofrequency ablation and examine the current methods, outcomes, complications, and limitations of RFA in breast cancer therapy.
Methods: Pub Med search for English Language articles on RFA in breast cancer.
Results: More than 25 studies were reviewed and we searched for number of tumors, average size, electrode used, if they successfully ablated the tumor, when the tumor was then resected and if the patients experienced any complication from the ablation.
Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation is an emerging minimally invasive therapy in small, localized breast cancer. Currently, no clinical trials have been published to directly compare RFA to the current standard of surgical resection. Ultimately, RFA will need clinical trials to evaluate oncologic outcomes involving long interval follow-up to determine survival, local control and disease progression before it becomes a reasonable alternative to surgical resection.